Help support the WCHA Forums by making a tax-deductible donation!

Slippery slope

Discussion in 'Paddles and Paddle Making' started by Craig Johnson, Nov 19, 2011.

  1. pklonowski

    pklonowski Unrepentant Canoeist

    Looks like a pretty good way to do it! Nice to have a jointer that wide... I'm jealous! :)
     
  2. wanderlustjake

    wanderlustjake Beginner Canoeist

    Craig,

    Thanks for taking the time to document your process. Looks like a good way to go. Envious of the joiner too! BTW, congratulations on making Murat's Blog.
     
  3. Denis M. Kallery

    Denis M. Kallery Passed Away July 3, 2012 In Memoriam

    Pictures of the process would be much appreciated by everyone --I think
    Denis
     
  4. Easternrivers

    Easternrivers Traditionalist

    When you see the process it looks so simple!
    I have not made many paddles as I thought it to be alot of hand work and labour intensive.
    Now I gotta go to the shop this winter!
    I now have the tools as you show to make this a far easier job...
    Thank You Again!
    Wendell
     
  5. Denis M. Kallery

    Denis M. Kallery Passed Away July 3, 2012 In Memoriam

    Craig,
    Thank-you! Makes it much clearer.
    Denis
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Craig Johnson

    Craig Johnson LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Attached Files:

  7. pklonowski

    pklonowski Unrepentant Canoeist

    Excellent! Your workbench looks like mine when I'm working on paddles... planes, spokeshaves, scrapers, & shavings are scattered everywhere. Looks like a nice piece of work!
     
  8. Kathryn Klos

    Kathryn Klos squirrel whisperer

    Your paddle is my favorite style-- beautifully done!
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Craig Johnson

    Craig Johnson LOVES Wooden Canoes

    new paddle done

    So if you have been following this thread you might be interested in this. I finished the poplar paddle I was making in the photos I used to demonstrate my method. If you saw my first paddles you can see I like to just let the beautiful wood grain be emphasized along with a pleasing form. Poplar isn't as nice as the other woods but it is nice to paint so I thought I would give that a try. I had been cruising Murat's blog for inspiration, not that I am in any way trying for historical correctness, but I came upon this and I think you can see why it fit.
    http://paddlemaking.blogspot.com/2009/12/canoe-museum-paddle-replicas.html
    I also used the copper tip I had made and I did decide to shave down the tip of the paddle so that it fit flush with the rest of the blade all the way around. Quite a bit of extra effort but worth it on my own paddle. Then I smeared it with epoxy and jammed it on, hoping the epoxy would fill any voids between wood and copper so the copper wouldn't deform from use. I polished and lacquered the tip, painted the blade and handle with leftover epifanes from my 39 Kennebec restoration, and oiled the grips. Here is a link to more photos.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/71113210@N08/sets/
    Thanks.
    Craig
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Dec 11, 2011
  10. Murat V

    Murat V LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Great job, Craig. The whole combination of painting with the shiny copper tip makes the paddle a sweet looking match for your maple leaf Kennebec. Your paddle actually reminded me of a company here in Toronto selling painted paddles based on the Semaphore naval flag system.

    http://www.contactvoyagingco.com/SearchResults.asp?Cat=102

    If you plan on doing any more painting, then maybe some of the patterns might interest you.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    Craig Johnson

    Craig Johnson LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Thanks Murat,
    Yes I had already seen those on your site and they influenced my decision. Probably going back to natural finished hardwood, maybe some carving.
     
  12. ozarkpaddler

    ozarkpaddler Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Wow, beautiful paddles, especially the walnut. I have a Langford walnut beavertail. A bit heavy, but feels good in the hands.
     

Share This Page