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Nessmuk's "pudding stick"

Discussion in 'Paddles and Paddle Making' started by kferguson, Aug 20, 2010.

  1. OP
    OP
    kferguson

    kferguson Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Well I messaged the Adirondack museum again and this time they got back to me. Dead end though:( The collection of Nessmuk's canoes, some originally acquired by the Smithsonian, does document the little paddle but no photo or drawing, whereabouts unknown. Here is their message....

    Dear Mr. Ferguson,
    We do have the Rushton Nessmuk model canoe Wee Lassie in our
    collection as well as the paddle used with it (60.53.1-2), We also have
    Sairy Gamp on long term loan (L65.17). Unfortunately, however, Sairy Gamp
    did not come with its paddles. The Smithsonian Institution's bulletin 127,
    Catalogue of the Watercraft Collection in the United States National Museum
    compiled and edited by Carl W. Mitman in 1923, describes the boat (which was
    then in Washington) and states that there was "one small paddle; one
    double-bladed paddle" with the boat. The dimensions were: "small paddle,
    17 inches long, blade 3 inches wide; double (jointed) paddle, 6 feet 1
    inch." No dimension was given for the width of the double-bladed paddle's
    blades.
    Several years ago I corresponded with Paula Johnson, curator of
    watercraft at the Smithsonian, about the paddles. She examined their
    records and collections and could not locate the paddles.
    I'm afraid that's all I can tell you about the "pudding stick." I
    hope this has been helpful.

    Sincerely yours,

    Hallie E. Bond, Curator
    Adirondack Museum
    P.O. Box 99
    Blue Mountain Lake, NY 12812
    (518) 352-7311, ext. 105

    Oh well, life needs some mysteries,eh?:rolleyes: So it looks like I will need to reinvent the wheel after all, which I had in mind to do anyway. Nessmuk, wherever you are, I bet you're having a good chuckle over this:p

    Hey, has anyone ever tried contacting the Smithsonian with a question:confused:

    ...some folks just never give up.
     
  2. Kathryn Klos

    Kathryn Klos squirrel whisperer

    I can't help thinking Nessmuk's paddles are squirreled-away, deep within the bowels of the Smithsonian. Many large museums don't know what they have... like the Adney model that was discovered by Ted Behne.

    Kathy
     
  3. OP
    OP
    kferguson

    kferguson Curious about Wooden Canoes

    No reply from the Smithsonian so far :)
     

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