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Kennebec sailing canoe,,any info appreciated

Discussion in 'Wood and Canvas' started by John Maderic, Nov 7, 2013.

  1. Benson Gray

    Benson Gray Canoe History Enthusiast Staff Member

    The Kennebec records for serial numbers 22159 and 22559 both show 12 foot long canoes so it probably isn't one of those. My guess is that you have the Kennebec canoe with serial number 22659. This is a 17 foot long Kennebec model shown on pages 138 and 139 of volume four in the Kennebec ledgers. It was planked by Vigue on March 12th, 1937. The sponsons type B were added by F. Roy on the same day. The canvas covering and first filler coat were applied by Thib. on March 20th, 1937. Mansell added the second filler coat and rails on the July 3rd, 1937. The "F 22" (Function number 22 or the keel?) and "F24" (Function number 24 or the thwarts?) were completed by Thib. on July 10th, 1937. The original color was "Sp." which may indicate that it was a special design. It shipped on July 14th, 1937 to location 37-237. This location is probably an order number but we don't currently have enough information to identify it.

    The scans of these build records can be found by following the links at the attached thumbnail images below. These original Kennebec records are reproduced through the courtesy of the Maine State Museum.

    The microfilms and scans of these records were created with substantial grants from the Wooden Canoe Heritage Association (WCHA). I hope that you will join or renew your membership to the WCHA so that services like this can continue. See http://www.wcha.org/wcha/ to learn more about the WCHA and http://store.wcha.org/WCHA-New-Membership.html to join.

    It is also possible that you could have another number or manufacturer if this description doesn't match your canoe. Feel free to reply here if you have any other questions.

    Benson
     

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    Last edited: Mar 16, 2014
  2. OP
    OP
    John Maderic

    John Maderic Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Thank you so much Benson. Late last week I removed the cap pieces that run from the stem down past the cowlings and also the outwales. Alot of care had to be taken as I found the nails really hold in that Mahogany. I worked my way slowly down each side with assorted prybars, block and hammer, and cut the nails with a hacksaw blade held by hand. This being my first restoration, the only advice I can offer others new at this is a lot of patience. Yesterday and today I used a full gallon of stripper and have given @ ten feet of the canoe two coats; removed with a plastic scraper. Then a nylon scrub brush and bronze wool with the TSP. I've stayed clear of the ends so far as to still do more documentation of the serial numbers. All the knowledge used was learned here from the forum members. You can read a lot about things, but theres nothing quite like the experience of doing it. Im trying to get far enough along on this canoe to put together a list of screws and nails, canvas, etc., to get an order in to one of the builders listed here to do this canoe and also my Otca. I'm just so thankful for the shared information and knowledge shared here by others who had to painstaking learn most of it themselves on their own. Just to see the builders on here offering so much information,,,thats like calling the garage and having them tell you how to fix your car. Thank you ladies and gentlemen.
     
  3. OP
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    John Maderic

    John Maderic Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    I had finally joined membership and received my first new issue of Wooden Canoe : February's issue. I've proudly handed out three of the four 'membership flyers' that were enclosed. I'm # 10384. I've had old copies from a previous member who moved and kind of retired from restoring canoes, but can now look forward to the new copies. I had contacted Chapter One , and as replied by Al Sienkiewicz: as it appears the western NY Chapter is the closest. Due to the distance to them, I didn't join the chapter as I wouldn't be able to make it to many of their gatherings. I've joked with one member that for now, I'm just a satellite paragraph. I have every intention of making at least several days of this summers Assembly at Paul Smiths.College
     
  4. Kathryn Klos

    Kathryn Klos squirrel whisperer

    Welcome, John! It will be good to meet you this summer at Paul Smith's.

    Kathy
     
  5. OP
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    John Maderic

    John Maderic Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Pictures and opinions of bow seat?

    I;m slowly progressing on the stripping and repair on this canoe. I'm doubtful I have the original bow seat. It appears to be different wood than the stern seat and gunwales. Also, there's no mast support in the floor of the canoe under the seat. Could anyone offer advice as to what bow seat this would have originally had? and any possible pictures? If not the sailing holed seat; just a version of the stern seat? I'm also looking for advice on making the floor rack out of cedar or mahogany as far as looks and versatility? Weight isn't an issue as it's already a fairly heavy canoe. Jamestown seems to be my best bet for varnish and two part teak cleaner. Probably going with Rollin for filler that's prove itself and canvas. I'm glad to see the other thread on the interest of the Kennebec decal as mine has the smaller version on the deck coaming and I wont be able to save it.
     

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    Last edited: Mar 20, 2014
  6. Kathryn Klos

    Kathryn Klos squirrel whisperer

    Hi John,

    Your mast seat appears to have pressed cane, whereas the stern seat has hand-woven... so you are probably right about the seat being a replacement. With the longer decks on this canoe I'm guessing it was the A-grade and trim would be mahogany. The original bow seat would be a version of the stern... someone here probably has one they can post a picture of. The disk drive on my computer doesn't work or I'd find a picture from the Kennebec catalog, if there is one. But there certainly wouldn't be anything "wrong" with continuing to use this mast seat even if it isn't original, as it's part of the canoe's history... and if you wanted to sail the canoe you have a start on what you'd need. If you re-create the original bow seat, I'll bet you can find a home for that mast seat by posting in the classifieds.

    Kathy
     
  7. Benson Gray

    Benson Gray Canoe History Enthusiast Staff Member

    There are Kennebec threads at http://forums.wcha.org/showthread.php?3986, http://forums.wcha.org/showthread.php?7507 and http://forums.wcha.org/showthread.php?9049 with pictures. The images at http://forums.wcha.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=6436&d=1226254804 and http://forums.wcha.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=15516&d=1305808934 show the bow seat. The one attached below is from the 1927 catalog. I agree that the bow seat does not look original. Old Town floor racks were usually spruce but cedar or mahogany should be fine. Good luck,

    Benson
     

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  8. OP
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    John Maderic

    John Maderic Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Stripped and Varnish started

    Over the last months I had stripped the interior doing two coats and scraping and brushings, rinsed with TSP substitute, then a third coat of stripper: scrape and final good rinse. A lot of sanding after a few ribs with splits running with the grain at the ends repaired The Epifanes varnish was mxed 50 / 50 with mineral spirits for the first two coats. More like 70/ 30 the third coat. Very very light sanding between coats. I wanted to at least protect the main hull while I do a few needed repairs. I kind of jumped ahead a step starting the varnish, but needed the inspiration to boost the momentum.
     

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  9. OP
    OP
    John Maderic

    John Maderic Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Stem bending form from an old wood door

    Combining the knowledge here with my past use of poly and oil based lacquer on other projects, I went with mineral spirits for a varnish thinner. I wanted to at least compare the sprits with results Ive gotten in the past with it and lacquer. I went 50/ 50 the first two coats with only a very light fine sanding in between. The third coat was closer to 60/40. These coats will now be given time to really dry and cure while a few other steps are done. I used a solid wood door to use as a nice solid base to cut and build a well supported stem form. I had been putting this off, but out in the warm air today in about four hours, I took my time and using scrap from the past, put together a usable apparatus. Just a little belt sanding and then fine align
     

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