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Dating a Peterborough Canadien

Discussion in 'Traditional All-Wood Construction' started by samb, Aug 27, 2020.

  1. samb

    samb LOVES Wooden Canoes

    I’m working on a Peterborough Canadien, serial no 1427 6021.

    When I return boats to customers I like to give them as much information about them as I can (often not much). This boat appears to be older than the 1930 rib boat I’ve just sorted for the same customer but I can’t tell how much older.

    The clues I have are the serial number (6021 seems quite low but I know that serial number history/dates are not known for peterboroughs.) and the use of thwart blocks rather than cleats (but it has cleats for the seats with slotted screws) and also robertson screws on the keel. I can’t tell anything from the decks - the present ones appear to be made of Jelutong in three pieces with a 1” king plank - not a good look! I can't tell anything from the joint of outer stem to keel - the present stem is in at least 3 different timbers and 6 pieces. The main part of the keel is oak.

    Anyone shed any light on this please?


    Thanks

    Sam
     
  2. Dan Miller

    Dan Miller cranky canoeist Staff Member

    The serial number includes the model number (1427), which was used from 1940 to 1956. The other part of the number is work order number, and there is nothing to be learned from it.

    Prior to 1940, Peterborough model numbers were two or three digits (the Canadien would have been model 44).
     
    mark turley likes this.
  3. OP
    OP
    samb

    samb LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Thanks.
    It must have had a hard life if it is so young!
     
  4. mark turley

    mark turley Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Very interesting my canoe has the number 1-92 but on the stern coaming, any ideas you can add to this please, regards mark
     
  5. Dan Miller

    Dan Miller cranky canoeist Staff Member

    Hard to say. I don't think I've seen a Peterborough with the number stamped on the coaming, unless it was on a metal tag affixed to the coaming. Some Canadian manufacturers that exported canoes to Europe nest them for shipment, and marked the thwarts and other bits with a number so they could be matched up with their hull when unpacked.

    There were also a few strip canoe builders in France as well. I recall that Dick Persson may have written about them, but I don't remember where. I've seen a couple of French-built strip canoes on this side of the Pond. One was at the No-Octane Regatta in Blue Mountain Lake oh, so many years ago - it was built by Matonnat (sp?).
     
  6. mark turley

    mark turley Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Thank you so much for your help it is most appreciated, is it ok if I can ask more on the strip canoe with you as this is the first time canoe project I've taken on and getting really hooked! Like now I am sanding the years of varnish off the copper heads are protruding would you leave them well alone or tap them home a little, thank you kind regards mark. Oh! Also where would you suggest I buy a new ring for the mast to sit through this one has seen the wars a little, kind regards mark.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    samb

    samb LOVES Wooden Canoes

    I’ve used a brass tank connector https://www.screwfix.com/p/pegler-brass-compression-flanged-tank-connector-28mm/1963g in the past, and may well do on the boat I’m doing now. It has a flat top and I eased the sharp corner edge with a file.


    I’d avoid sanding the hull if possible. The last thing you want to do is sand the heads off. You can get rid of the old finish with paint stripper, then you’ll need minimum sanding. I think if the heads are standing proud you could sink them with a hammer but would need something on the nail on the inside (like a clinching iron - I use an old lump hammer head) to make sure the nail bends that little bit more to keep the join tight.
    Sam
     
  8. mark turley

    mark turley Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Thank you Sam I am using lots of stripper and then scraping the lifted varnish of and then turps to remove any stripper I've missed and then a light sanding ( when dry ) to show the original wood but the heads feel raised slightly, would this show up much once I've gave a tremendous amount of high gloss varnish? Regards mark
     
  9. OP
    OP
    samb

    samb LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Everything shows up with high gloss varnish, that's why I don't use it!
     
  10. mark turley

    mark turley Curious about Wooden Canoes

    What would you recommend for the best results, providing i can get the equivalent in France/
     
  11. Andy Hutyera

    Andy Hutyera The Red Canoe Guy

    Epiphanes and other manufacturers offer a satin spar varnish. I usually use gloss with a final coat of satin.
     

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