Chestnut Indian Maiden glass removal

Discussion in 'Wood and Canvas' started by Graham, May 28, 2017.

  1. Graham

    Graham Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Have an old cedar canvas canoe that had the fiberglass treatment many years ago. Is there a best place to start with removing the glass? Just slice into it at one end and start with heat and a dull edge? Is heat the only recommended assist? The inside appears to be quite original and in reasonably good shape. Interesting slat seats and a single very thin thwart.
    Thanks for any advice.



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    Tnic likes this.
  2. Dave Osborn

    Dave Osborn LIFE MEMBER

    Here are a couple of YouTube videos.....




    It's a matter of getting a glass edge and working to remove it. Sometimes it pulls off in sheets. Sometimes it means working square inch by square inch with a heat gun. Putty knife, chisel, and pliers are the basic tools.
    I've never tries soaking a canoe prior to glass removal, but some say that a waterlogged canoe will give up its glass when heated, causing steam to help release the grip.
    Once the glass is removed, go back with heat to remove the residual resin. I find that a "pull type" scraper works best for that.
     
    Kathryn Klos and MGC like this.
  3. OP
    OP
    Graham

    Graham Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Thanks Dave - that's exactly what I was hoping for in order to start on a perfectly waterproof canoe. Could be a long process ahead. My non-WCHA neighbors say they like it the way it is :)
    The wet steaming idea sounds like a good one if it's going to be reluctant. And the pull scraper too.
    Nice big photo display on the new site setup. Great!
     
  4. MGC

    MGC Paddlephile

    I can see where they are coming from...it does look pretty good.....but ignore the voice of reason and carry on! That will be a really nice boat when it's repaired.
    I've always had good luck starting to pull the glass loose from the edge of the planking, so under where the gunwales are currently covering. Start by taking the outside rails off. I use a sharpened narrow flat bladed putty knife to get started and to remove any remaining resin. Take care not to gouge the planking if you choose to do that.
    Resin that may be trapped between planking can be picked out with an Exacto knife (the back of the blade) or the back of a locking knife.
    Enjoy!
     
  5. Andre Cloutier

    Andre Cloutier Firestarter

    Went to look at this one back in the winter, the owner was very vague and couldnt tell me if he used polyester or epoxy. After a better look, its got more epoxy on it that you could ever imagine. I passed on it since i figured it would be best to replank it. Daves advice is mostly for polyester saturated glass, ive done a bunch and they are not too bad, but epoxy is another story. Dont feel bad taking the rails off, they arent original and they have drips all over them! Nice boat though, shame he 'improved' it.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Graham

    Graham Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Hi Andre, I wondered if you'd seen this one, as it had been available for some time, and the owner had become much more flexible on price (probably lots of fiberglass feedback). But it sounds like a lot of patience may get the stuff off, so I'm willing to try, and am in no hurry. He got it from a Ducks Unlimited auction, and said it was already glassed, but it leaked, and he added a second layer. I'll update on how it comes along. I'm sure I'll never want to see glass again.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Graham

    Graham Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Had a few hours this afternoon, so took a deep breathe and started in. Thanks for the advice MGC and Dave, it's coming along just fine. I didn't take the outwales off because they were glassed on by the outer layer. I'll take them off next.
    There are two full glass coats. The top one comes off the base one without much heat. But the bottom one needs more heat to get it to let go - probably because there is so much material for it to go through.
    Shouldn't take too long at this rate... that's a relief. defiber.jpg.jpg
     
  8. MGC

    MGC Paddlephile

    The removal is usually pretty quick...the cleanup and finishing could drag on and make you question your judgement. You'll swear that you will never tackle one with glass again until the next "good one" comes along that needs to be saved..
    This hobby is one for folks that can ignore their better instincts as well as their spouse/partners complaints about all of the canoes in the garage, back yard, under the shed, in the basement friends barn etc.....
     
  9. Andre Cloutier

    Andre Cloutier Firestarter

    How's that glass pulling going? Glad I passed, this turned up. 60 or 61 Peterborough Iroquois , chestnut maiden branded as a Pete. Stripped too many glass boats in the past, wasn't up to the task!
     

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  10. OP
    OP
    Graham

    Graham Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    That's a nice one, and in great shape. I'm just back from a Velo Quebec bike tour in La Beauce, so I haven't had time to make more progress. But I'll get back on it this week. It's a little more than half stripped now, and the planks appear to be in good shape. The smell of hot resin is turning out to be less than pleasant.
    The Beauce is nice... a lot of wide but very shallow rivers in that part of the province. Need a flat bottom canoe there...
     

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