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BN Morris Project (maybe) S/N 12655

Discussion in 'Wood and Canvas' started by Scott Rowe, Sep 22, 2011.

  1. OP
    OP
    Scott Rowe

    Scott Rowe Random Adventurer

    Steaming Along

    Today I put the finishing touches on my steam box and successfully bent the two previously discussed ribs. However, at no point did the steamed ribs feel supple and why they didn't break I don't know. It took me at least 5 minutes to bend each rib. I've reviewed posts regarding steaming and will try some additional tactics before proceeding with the next set of ribs.
    The method I used was to wet the ribs with a hose and wet towel ten minutes prior to placing in the steam box. Then I steamed for about 35 minutes. I had so much resistance by the time I reached the sheer my hands were shaking!
    I'm thinking of setting the ribs in the steamer vertically instead of flat. Checking my steam box temp before starting the steam process (I started shortly after producing steam). Trimming my ribs a little longer (I only gave myself two extra inches maybe one more).
     
  2. Dan Miller

    Dan Miller cranky canoeist Staff Member

    If your rib stock is dry, soaking overnight or even a couple days is good. 10 minutes is enough for the surface to get wet, and that's all. Steaming is drying process, and the higher your moisture content is to begin, the better (to a point).

    Steam box temperature is a huge deal. Put a meat thermometer in it, and don't put your ribs in the box until it hits at least 200 degrees. Depending on how well your box is insulated (or not), it may not have hit that 200 degree temp within a half hour of steam drifting out.

    Do this, and assuming your rib stock is decent, they will bend like butter.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Scott Rowe

    Scott Rowe Random Adventurer

    Soaked an additional three ribs in my Wenonah canoe overnight (bathtub wasn't big enough) and use a thermometer on the steam box. Bending went much better!
     
  4. David McDaniel

    David McDaniel Canoe Dude

    Now thats a good use of a plastic canoe!
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Scott Rowe

    Scott Rowe Random Adventurer

    Lumps

    I was doing so well. I installed a rib in the bow where I had some weak planking. Although I splinted the planks nearby I created a lump in the hull bottom. My hull is officially hogged. Even though my steamed ribs hug the outside hull tightly when shaping them, I still have a hard time getting the bent ribs to conform to the bilge curve without a lot of downward pressure when clinching. It's this downward pressure that hogged my hull. I will have to remove this rib (like my hull needs more holes). To bad as it fit without gaps!
     
  6. Dave Wermuth

    Dave Wermuth Who hid my paddle?

    Sometimes if I think i'm having trouble I'll not nail the rib top to the inwale until after I've installed tacks. I start at the keel and work my way up. I may just put one tack per plank/rib or install them all. Then I'll put the nails in the rib top. The penn yan I just did was so agreeable with all twelve ribs I felt lucky. Is the weak planking rotted? OR too thin?
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Scott Rowe

    Scott Rowe Random Adventurer

    There is one butt joint on this rib and there is one badly cracked plank as well. As I try to close the gap in the bilge area when tacking the rib I have to push down on the rib to get it to conform. When I did this I exerted a lot of down force and pushed the hull out. I was so pleased that I had such a tight fit I ignored the hull shape. I'm thinking of screwing a temporary keel in place to hold the shape.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Scott Rowe

    Scott Rowe Random Adventurer

    I have a butt joint on the garboard plank and a crack plank, all on this rib ( with some adjacent weakness as well). As I try to get a good fit in the bilge area and push down on the rib ends I exerted to much down pressure distorting the hull. Even with some nicely formed ribs I'm finding it challenging to close the gap in the bilge areas.
    I'm thinking more temporary splints. A temporary keel at this point may help.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Scott Rowe

    Scott Rowe Random Adventurer

    I have a butt joint on the garboard plank and a crack plank, all on this rib ( with some adjacent weakness as well). As I try to get a good fit in the bilge area and push down on the rib ends I exerted to much down pressure distorting the hull. Even with some nicely formed ribs I'm finding it challenging to close the gap in the bilge areas.
    I'm thinking more temporary splints. A temporary keel at this point may help.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Scott Rowe

    Scott Rowe Random Adventurer

    17 'Morris A Dimensions

    Where can I find a good source for Morris dimensions. As I slog along tack by tack, rib by rib, and try to keep my rescue Morris's girlish figure I find myself questioning certain dimensions. Although the bow and stern thwarts only have one set of mounting holes the bow seat frame has been remounted essentially squeezing the beam in that area. Also, the thwart ends (one which has Old Town bolts) were mounted such that they nearly touch the sheer plank. Is this right or should they end just under the inwale? Does anyone have the extreme dimensions of the 17' 4" A Morris thwarts?
     
  11. OP
    OP
    Scott Rowe

    Scott Rowe Random Adventurer

    Planking

    Although I haven't got all my ribs in, I did install one plank. And although I thought it would be straightforward, I have a question. The planking was planed to the proper thickness but when installed, some of the plank sits quite proud of the adjacent old planking. I expect that factory fairing or shrinkage might be the explanation and that its a simple matter of planing and sanding to fit. BUT what about all the tacks that will be in the way of sanding or planing, do I re-clinch these as they become too proud? I appreciate any advice regarding this. Thanks.
     

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